Pigs in Heaven

Our Town – Act II

Summary [P]eople are meant to go through life two by two. ’Tain’t natural to be lonesome. (See Important Quotations Explained) The Stage Manager watches the audience return from intermission, and announces that three years have passed. It is now July 7, 1904, just after commencement at the local high school. The Stage Manager tells us …

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Our Town – Act III

Summary There’s something way down deep that’s eternal about every human being. (See Important Quotations Explained) The stage has been set with three rows of chairs, representing gravestones. At the end of the intermission, Mrs. Gibbs, Simon Stimson, Mrs. Soames, and Wally Webb, among others, take their seats. All of these characters have died in …

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Our Town – Character List

id=”Stage Manager”> Stage Manager –  The host of the play and the dramatic equivalent of an omniscient narrator. The Stage Manager exercises control over the action of the play, cueing the other characters, interrupting their scenes with his own interjections, and informing the audience of events and objects that we cannot see. Although referred to only …

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Our Town – Emily Webb

Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it?—every, every minute? (See Important Quotations Explained) With the exception of the Stage Manager, Emily is Our Town’s most significant figure. Emily and George Gibbs’s courtship becomes the basis of the text’s limited narrative action—these two characters thus prove extremely significant not only to the …

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Our Town – George Gibbs

Well, I think that’s just as important as college is, and even more so. That’s what I think. (See Important Quotations Explained) If Emily displays an awareness—even if only after death—of the transience of human existence, George Gibbs lives his life in the dark. George is an archetypal all-American boy. A local baseball star and …

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