Giants in the Earth

For Whom The Bell Tolls – Epigraph and Chapters One–Two

Summary: Epigraph For Whom the Bell Tolls opens with an epigraph, a short quotation that introduces the novel, sets the mood, and presents a theme. This epigraph is from a short essay by the seventeenth-century British poet John Donne. Donne writes that no person stands alone—“No man is an island, entire of itself”—because everyone belongs …

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For Whom The Bell Tolls – Chapters Thirty–Thirty-three

Summary: Chapter Thirty Robert Jordan thinks to himself as he walks back from Primitivo’s post. He struggles with the conflict between wanting to follow orders and believing that the orders are useless. He remembers his family. His mother bullied his weak father, who finally committed suicide with the same rifle that his own father had …

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For Whom The Bell Tolls – Chapters Twenty-seven–Twenty-nine

Summary: Chapter Twenty-seven “Pasionaria says ‘Better to die on thy—’” Joaquín was saying to himself as the drone came nearer them. Then he shifted suddenly into “Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. . . .” (See Important Quotations Explained) El Sordo and his small group of fighters defend their hill. El …

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For Whom The Bell Tolls – Chapters Thirty-four–Thirty-nine

Summary: Chapter Thirty-four Andrés rides through the night to deliver Robert Jordan’s dispatch to General Golz. He thinks about his feeling of relief when Robert Jordan asked him to deliver his message—relief because killing thrills Andrés in a way that embarrasses him. He remembers having the same feeling of exhilaration and embarrassment on his town’s …

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